Why Do I Need To Eat Every Day?

Yes, I know it’s because I’m human and we operate best if we eat with a certain amount of “eat multiple times a day” and “eat a variety of foods”. But it’s frustrating me at the moment, and I’m venting, so deal.

I know my pandemic experience has been a really good one. We have a house in the suburbs. We can go outside without immediately running into other people. The programmer has an office to work in – actually we all have an office. Plus other spaces! And a huge kitchen! Plus my husband likes to cook!

It’s the “not going to restaurants” thing that gets me down. Meal planning and cooking more started as a novelty, but now the “what do we eat today?” question is just … I’m over 50, y’all, and I get tired of trying to figure this out. Left to my own devices I would probably subsist on hummus (in single-serving packs), crackers (to scoop hummus with), bananas, and cheese. Or frozen food. And cookies. It’s a rut that served me fairly well after my pulmonary embolism. But it’s not really enough to thrive on.

I actually feel better when I eat more plants and otherwise have more variety. This week I got some baby spinach with the idea of making at least 2 salads. Instead, I added a salad’s worth of spinach to ramen (along with tuna and green onions.) Today I grabbed a big bowl and put in a few cups of spinach, shredded cheese, bacon bits, and salad dressing. I was a bit impressed with how good it tasted and that I was able to put it together quickly.

What are your food solutions these days?

2 thoughts on “Why Do I Need To Eat Every Day?

  1. I find that having to choose what to make is a bigger problem for me than being bored by the choices.

    My wife and I just try to rotate through a list of meals we know how to cook: eggs; beef with gravy, mashed potatoes, and a cooked vegetable; chicken caesar salad; tacos; veggie stir fry (usually mushrooms, zucchini, and tomatoes) and pierogies; chicken nuggets and french fries; haluski (an Eastern European dish, though we make a heavily Americanized version); chili; some kind of pasta (each family member picks their own sauces and toppings); grilled chicken and a salad; burgers, hot dogs, and baked beans; macaroni and cheese; ramen.

    One side dish was used a lot during the pandemic until the kids got sick of it was baked broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, or zucchini. Slice it, coat it lightly in olive oil, sprinkle with Adobo or with garlic salt and pepper, bake until it starts to crisp. It tastes better than most potato chips.

    We also keep lots of fruit in the house, which the kids tear through like it’s being dumped in a wood chipper.

    What I want to do is just make it an ordered schedule, so I don’t even have to think about choices. But sometimes I announce that tonight’s meal is eggs and get a chorus of complaints. So it’s still something that gets negotiated a lot.

  2. I have two problems happening for me. The first is a medication that did things to my digestive system, so I have to be careful what I eat if I don’t want pain and trips to the bathroom. The second is roommate who, for a variety of reasons, doesn’t clean the kitchen very often, even though she does cook. At the moment, it is easiest to do frozen meals for the most part. I looked into one of those meal kit deliveries (which seems to run about $9 a serving) and decided it was not doable at this time. I hope someday that cooking and eating goes back to being a pleasure instead of a problem.

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