Category: Anti-Obesity Programs

  • Thanksgiving

    Thanksgiving yesterday was turkey roasted in a bag; stuffing with mushrooms, water chestnuts, and cashews; green bean casserole; followed by apple crisp. Fridge is full, but it’s not like we emptied it beforehand. Today I had a blueberry muffin with coffee. Around 11 I heated a bowl of leftover veggie curry, then around 2 a […]

  • Workplace “Wellness” Programs

    Slate has a good article on how “wellness” programs aren’t.  There’s good details on why they tend not to actually improve health. But the money quote is: Under the ACA, wellness programs are a legal way to shift a significant portion of the cost of premiums onto employees deemed unhealthy. Wellness programs don’t save money […]

  • Frustration

    [Note: Includes discussion of weight loss and history of intentional weight loss. Please avoid if you don’t want to read it.] Visited the endocrinologist again to follow up on my med changes. On my way into the office, the doc asks how the meds have made me feel; I said that I haven’t noticed much change […]

  • No, Really, Treat the PROBLEM

    A comment for Treat Weight First? that I did not approve, but found striking for its ability to completely misunderstand, was: There must be some powerful drugs in that koolaid you’re drinking. You admit you are morbidly obese, you have multiple health problems directly related to obesity, yet you shun the doctors that are trying to help […]

  • Treating Weight First?

    The Twitterverse has been busy talking about some new treatment guidelines for fatties. Ragen Chastain posted about a piece from Medscape called “New US Obesity Guidelines: Treat the Weight First,” which also has quotes from the lead author.  I also clicked over to the guidelines themselves. They start with an extremely helpful objective, to wit: […]

  • “a successful weight loss drug could potentially have huge sales”

    Wow, so many people want to lose weight! Wouldn’t a weight loss drug make piles of money?  Check out this business article on the new drug the FDA approved! In a clinical trial involving patients without diabetes, those who took Contrave had an average weight loss of 4.1 percent beyond those receiving a placebo. About […]

  • QOTD: Workplace Wellness

    Much criticism of “employer wellness programs” have been focused on privacy concerns and angering employees.  But now we’re seeing more practical concerns (also known as “does this even work?”). Which leads me to this quote of the day, directed at CEOs: Suppose a vendor made you this proposal: “Pay us to take your employees off the […]

  • Tell Me Again How It’s “For My Own Good”

    Lara Frater wrote about this and I wanted to boost the signal.  The Rudd Center recently came out with a study (PDF link) showing that weight stigma affects the stress hormone cortisol. Exposure to weight-stigmatizing stimuli was associated with greater cortisol reactivity among lean and overweight women. These findings highlight the potentially harmful physiological consequences of exposure to weight stigma. […]

  • Some Workplace Wellness Programs Work

    I found it surprising too! A study of over 67,000 people who could join PepsiCo’s “Healthy Living” wellness program found that 7 years of participation in a “disease management” program resulted in a net savings — the cost of the program was less than the money saved by reduced healthcare costs.  These sorts of programs are “aimed […]

  • Opting Out Of The Illusion Of Immortality

    Deb Burgard has a terrific post on the latest “being fat makes you die, damnit” study.  Masters’ central argument seems to be that even though the repeated findings for decades of rigorous research (reviewed by Flegal, 2013) has found that BMI and mortality are only weakly correlated, and that higher BMI may actually correlate with longevity […]

  • You’re SORRY? Oh fuck you.

    Dr. Peter Attia thinks about his former patient often, the woman who came to him in the emergency room at Johns Hopkins Hospital one night seven years ago. She was obese and suffering from a severe complication of Type 2 diabetes, a foot ulcer, which required an urgent amputation. At the time, Dr. Attia admits, […]

  • Why I Think Declaring Obesity A Disease is Harmful

    It’s inaccurate: A fit fat person is usually healthier than a sedentary thin person. Obese people (BMI of 30 to 34.9) have no greater risk of early death than those of “normal” body size (BMI 18.5 to 24.9).  Most people who fit the clinical definition of obese are in the smaller categories. “Normal-weight” people who think […]

  • In The News

    The AMA has endorsed the idea that “obesity” is a disease, not a “condition”.  (Personally I consider it a characteristic.)  Forbes states that this is “a move member physicians hope will spur better reimbursement for treating overweight Americans and create better health outcomes.”  Exactly how it’s supposed to “create better health outcomes” when commonly prescribed treatments do […]

  • The Fitbit

    I’ve been seeing pedometers discussed a bit lately.  In some ways, they get a bad rap; we’ve seen them [mis-]used in “wellness” programs and that accuracy varies.  Although they can be amusing, as noted by one NY Times commenter: Fitbit has a clip on model that I attach to the waistband of tights or to the center of […]

  • Around the web

    A useful discussion of how to say the right thing to someone in hospital (or other bad situation.) Christianity Today wonders if antidepressants keep people from God.  Fred Clark at Slacktivist responds: No pious jackasses sit around pondering “Should Christians Take Insulin?” No insufferably holier-than-thou idiots pretend it would be deeply spiritual if they said, “Rattlesnake […]

  • Things to Read

    A clear explanation of why  New York’s fat hatred is much more harmful than the soda ban from Melissa McEwan: People do not die of “obesity.” Some fat people die from complications of what are commonly known as “obesity-related diseases,” like heart disease and diabetes, but those diseases have only been shown to be correlated with fat, not caused by fat. […]

  • Weight Loss Myths

    Shakesville posted about this Gina Kolata NY Times piece already, but I wanted to highlight this: David B. Allison, who directs the Nutrition Obesity Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham […] sought to establish what is known to be unequivocally true about obesity and weight loss. His first thought was that, of course, […]